Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: May 18: #SchoolLibrarians, #SummerReading, #RosieRevere + #Math

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. Topics this week include #BookLists, #Coding, #CommonCore, #Curiosity, #DiverseBooks, #PBL, #SchoolLibrarians, #ScreenTime, #SummerReading, #testing, publishing, schools, teaching, and #RosieRevere.

Top Tweet of the Week

How Will Save the World by | Josh says we need to give them tools to teach |

Book Lists

TenNineEightBest Toddler Books (Books I Wish I Was Still Over and Over), a from | Most of these were faves in my house, too

Explore Your World: 30 Mighty Girl Books About Outdoor Discovery from to for about

Perfect Summer Kids and Parents Will Adore, from | My family is listening to right now |

Jasmine-toguchi-200x30020 Books for Young Readers To Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month & Year-Round | via

32 Titles for Every Day of Asian Pacific American History Month & Beyond | via https://t.co/2QxwGp7xQS

Some appealing titles here: A Top Fifteen List of in & Fantasy by |

Cybils

VincentTheoOn the Blog: Interview with , author of Sr. High Winner VINCENT + THEO from

Events, Programs and Research

May Have Killed the Cat, But It Makes the via reviews recent study + shares tips for creating a culture conducive to curiosity at

Study concludes that Learn Less When They Sense Teacher Hostility - | snide remarks + sarcasm are a barrier to

Growing Bookworms / Summer Reading

I love this: 5 Great Places to Stash Books Around Your Home to Encourage by Lindsay Barrett

RT @KayeNewtonBooks: Reigniting a Passion for Summer Reading (and through out the year) ! https://t.co/FhbhIWSEq7

20+ Engaging Ideas from | activity calendars, superheroes, challenges + lots more

The summer conundrum: Fight , or give the kids a break? - Andrea Orr | | Personally I vote for the break but w/ plenty of

On Reading, Writing, Blogging, and Publishing

QuestioneersNew adventures await literary heroine (+ Ada Twist + Iggy Peck) as + launch series https://t.co/5RUoTbLmPv

A Salute to the Reprints from | Here’s to Getting A Second Chance in 2018

What are the ingredients of a universally appealing early fiction series? By

Schools and Libraries

How to Really Thank a by | Vote for politicians who believe in funding public , give teachers livable wages + resources

Can Change Measures of Success by Focusing on Meaningful Work Instead of Test Scores? | Amadou Diallo |

Supporting a real no-brainer | Studies show they impact student , espec. for students of color from disadvantaged neighborhoods

Poverty & Reading: The Sad and Troubling Loss of and Real Librarians + how it hurts kids in poor

The Anger Don’t Feel Comfortable Expressing, + some suggestions for calming that "ill-tempered beast"

Social Media and Screen Time

"Let’s find ways to work alongside (our kids) as they work to develop healthy, positive, and balanced habits" re: says https://t.co/DiZqDnNnmU

STEM

CommonCoreDummiesWhere "successful education starts; w/ adults who know what questions to ask + who have the skills to help children discover their own solutions

Teen entrepreneur thinks Aussies are overstating the importance of + should focus on softer skills like | via

In Op-Ed, argues that should stop encouraging kids to take + focus on things like + instead

16+ Outdoor Summer Activities for Kids, a roundup of ideas from blogs, etc. by

© 2018 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.


Growing Bookworms Newsletter: May 16: #HarryPotter, Notebooks, and Post-It Flags

JRBPlogo-smallToday, I will be sending out a new issue of the Growing Bookworms email newsletter. (If you would like to subscribe, you can find a sign-up form here.) The Growing Bookworms newsletter contains content from my blog focused on growing joyful learners, mainly bookworms, but also mathematicians and learners of all types. The newsletter is usually sent out every three weeks.

Newsletter Update:  In this issue I have three literacy milestone posts and three posts with links that I shared recently on Twitter. The milestones are about reading the first Harry Potter book (on her own), keeping notebooks everywhere, and using post-it flags to highlight books. 

Reading Update:  In the last three weeks I finished one young adult and six adult titles. I read/listened to: 

  • LongLongSleepAnna Sheehan: A Long, Long Sleep. Candlewick Press. Young Adult Dystopia. Completed May 5, 2018, on Kindle. This is the first YA book in some time that has really grabbed me, and that I didn't want to put down. There was just enough mystery to keep me guessing, and some interesting (if dark) predictions for the future direction of the world. 
  • Jacqueline Winspear: To Die but Once (Maisie Dobbs). Harper. Adult Historical Mystery. Completed April 26, 2018, on MP3. I adore these books, and this one was no exception. I really care what happens to all of characters in Maisie's world who are imperiled by WWII (especially the young men). 
  • Angela Marsons: Silent Scream (D.I. Kim Stone, No. 1) Bonier Zaffre. Adult Mystery. Completed April 28, 2018, on Kindle. This UK-based mystery was a bit dark, but did keep me guessing. 
  • Yong Zhao: Reach for Greatness: Personalizable Education for All Children. Corwin. Adult Nonfiction. Completed May 1, 2018, on Kindle. Zhao has some interesting ideas about the problems with our one-size fits all, focus on the gaps instead of bringing everyone up system of public education. But I'm not sure that his conclusion about personalizable education are realistic. I found a lot of passages to highlight, though, and do intend to go back and give these ideas another look. 
  • Dana Stabenow: A Fatal Thaw (Kate Shugak, #2). Berkley. Adult Mystery. Completed May 2, 2018, on MP3.
  • Dana Stabenow: Dead in the Water (Kate Shugak, #3). Berkley. Adult Mystery. Completed May 6, 2018, on MP3. I'm enjoying this series, but am ready for a break for a while after listening to three of the books in a short time. 
  • Victoria Thompson: Murder on Union Square (Gaslight Mysteries). Berkley. Adult Mystery. Completed May 15, 2018, on MP3. I like this series, but found this installment a bit slow-paced. The team members spend a lot of time sitting around together, updating each other on what they've learned, and I found my attention wandering a bit as I listened. 

SecretBookSconeI'm currently listening to The Secret, Book & Scone Society by Ellery Adams, the first book in the new Miracle Springs, North Carolina series. On my Kindle I'm reading No Life But This by Anna Sheehan and also The Self-Driven Child by William Stixrud and Ned Johnson. I have many samples stored up on my Kindle, and many print books stacked up on my nightstand, but reading time has been at a premium of late. Someday... I am still reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix with my daughter. We are up to Valentine's Day, and she continues to be utterly immersed in the world of Hogwarts. 

AFineDessertMy daughter and I spent some quality time at the public library this weekend. She read a stack of Berenstain Bears easy readers to herself, asked me to read her a favorite picture book that she spotted on the shelf, and then checked out ten new graphic novels. Since then, it's been hard to get her out of the car, or to finish getting dressed in the morning, because she is immersed in the new books. But certainly worth it!

I haven't been doing a very good job of keeping up my daughter's list of books read, because she usually doesn't tell me when she finishes something. I will find stacks of picture books on the floor or her room, or see her re-reading some graphic novel or other in bed, but I'm not really sure what she's actually finished. My gut feeling is that trying to pin her down for the purposes of documentation might take away some of her delight in reading the books. So I am letting it go. I'll try to log all of the library books when we return those, at least. 

Thanks for reading, and for growing bookworms!

© 2018 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Literacy Milestone: Reading the First Harry Potter Book

LiteracyMilestoneAThis is as much a cultural milestone than a literacy milestone, I think. But my daughter was so, so, so excited and proud the other day when she finished reading the first Harry Potter book on her own. I must admit that I was a bit skeptical when she told me that she was reading it at school for her D.E.A.R. book. I thought it would be a bit advanced for her - she has abandoned a number of middle grade titles this year (with my full support - she wasn't ready for them). 

HarryPotterBook1But I think that Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone held some advantages that helped her to persevere:

  1. I had already read it to her.
  2. She had seen the movie at least once (and the movie is quite true to the book).
  3. I am currently reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix aloud to her.
  4. She is passionately interested in the world of Harry Potter. 
  5. The book was always handy. She had a copy in class (from her classroom library), a copy in her bed (my copy), and a third copy downstairs, from a Gryffindor-themed set that my husband bought us for Christmas. Interestingly, she didn't read from the illustrated edition, which we also have. 

All of these other experiences with the Harry Potter universe provided her with plenty of scaffolding. I think that helped her to get through what would otherwise have been a challenging read. And, of course, when a child is passionately interested in a book, she will often find a way to get through it, even if it is a above her so-called reading level. 

I don't think that she's going to be racing through the other six books any time soon, though I do expect that she'll be working on Book 2 this summer. My hope and expectation is that she is young enough (at just 8) that she will want me to read books six and seven to her before she reads them herself. Because I am really enjoying sharing the books with her. 

Incidentally my favorite response to this milestone came from a friend on Facebook, who wrote: "My 9 year old read this over my shoulder and started clapping for her." This nine year old doesn't actually know my daughter, but that doesn't matter. There's a bond between fans that transcends distance. 

Where were you when you finished reading the first Harry Potter book? Do YOU remember? 

© 2018 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: May 11: #Curiosity, #Treehouses, #SummerReading + #TeacherAppreciationWeek

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. Topics this week include: #BookAccess, #BookLists, #curiosity, #Cybils, #DiverseBooks, #FourTendencies, #GraphicNovels, #Homework, #KidsNeedBooks, #literacy, #nonfiction, #ReadAloud, #SchoolChoice, #SchoolLibraries, #SocialMedia, #SummerReading, #parenting, and #schools.

Top Tweet of the Week

Fabulous 8th Grade Reading - Perfect for (focused on contemporary ) from https://t.co/zkCfhz24c4

Book Lists

HotHotRoti2018 List for Grades PreK-8 | | There's a webinar on 5/16 to discuss

In the Classroom: Gateway and the Nonfiction Continuum | tips and from

I just downloaded a bunch of these as samples for potential : Witness, Murder, Killer: 13+ Mystery Titles for Ages 13 and up | from

Cybils

SpillZoneOn the blog: Interview with + Alex Puvilland, authors of winner SPILL ZONE from

Diversity

The Diversity Gap in Children’s Book Publishing, 2018 (narrowing but still large) |

RT @Reason: The liberal media's answer to ideological diversity concerns: ban conservatives, hire socialists https://t.co/Wm4uwahPhP

Research Summary: is Related to Greater College grads on both sides of the political spectrum are less tolerant of their political opponents than are people w/ less education

Events, Programs and Research

Author writes about how she (inspired by ) kicked off a movement that's resulted in stacks of books going to various

ScholasticSummer2018RT @ScholasticEd: The Scholastic Challenge starts today! Read more about how educators, public librarians and community partner organizations can help kids keep reading all summer long:

Appreciate Every Day, Not Just on One Special Week urges | is a noble calling

A recent NYU Steinhardt study shows that access to books remains a significant barrier to with children, but free book vending machine program helped some via

Dawn Finch urges participation in the campaign | Goal is for every UK schoolchild to have access to a great library + professional librarians

GardenerCarpenter Is a New Power in - In developing , scientists are starting to look to children for inspiration

by others is extremely effective – a new study tested a key reason why: retrieval practice – https://t.co/Q0KejBuODg

is key to early childhood success in and , especially for kids from poorer communities, according to new study https://t.co/g1iD0OyQzX

What About ? – agrees w/ that kids are more alike than different in how they learn

Growing Bookworms

MissSpidersTeaPartyLessons from Listening to Toddlers by Meghan Rose | They show memorization, ability to follow a

"And, here’s a big truth: The root of the big decline in a love for reading (by kids) is us, specifically the English Teacher" w/ suggestions for change | via

Creating Joyful Plans by | , partnerships, + more

Miscellaneous

FourTendenciesI have found learning about 's fascinating + illuminating. Here's an overview in : How These 4 Different Personality Types Find Motivation https://t.co/jIHMxcL1mF

These for Grown-Ups described in are awesome! I especially liked the one with a area https://t.co/r8WL9F560M

On Reading, Writing, Blogging, and Publishing

Storytelling Goes Graphic | Analysis of the boom via

Some interesting tidbits in Morning Notes: The Places You’ll Forget Edition — + more

Parenting

Tips on helping talk to students about + boost their development, w/ strong sample questions | Max Brand

Schools and Libraries

TwiceExceptionalWhy So Many Gifted Yet Struggling Students Are Hidden In Plain Sight | Interview w/ +

Excellent piece: The Problem With Hurrying Childhood | "Kids should like school" + we should honor their growth

Interesting piece on how limitations from can trickle into , limiting student + hence enjoyment of

How to Plan and Implement In | has some ideas | https://t.co/CKZda5brMa

Trump Has Hurt Support for , But It Remains Popular, Survey Finds -

One Ohio 's Approach to Bad Behavior and Trauma - Katherine Reynolds Lewis | helping kids to manage "overwhelming feelings and control their impulses"

Some thoughts from on how the US should be Appreciating | | Respect, income commensurate w/ work / + resources

Social Media

BigDisconnectThe Teenage Trap - For some kids, hyper-vigilance that they maintain online is anxiety-producing | Jennifer Breheny Wallace https://t.co/si76jQUOOZ

STEM

Challenge Your Kids to Try Something New this Summer | the K-12 Game-a-thon asks kids to design a to solve a problem https://t.co/ed0MfALpxs

© 2018 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.


Literacy Milestone: Post-It Flags in Books

LiteracyMilestoneAThe other day my daughter demonstrated a milestone of the serious book reader: the need to flag a particular passage so that she can find it again. We are a little more than halfway through Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (we usually only read it for 20 minutes a day during breakfast). We came to the scene in which Cho wanted Harry to ask her on their first date, to Hogsmeade for Valentine's Day. Cho's goal was obvious to my daughter, at just eight. Harry, however, was totally clueless.

HarryPotterPhoenixMy daughter found this scene HILARIOUS. She immediately grabbed for a post-it flag, scribbled "down" on it, and placed it at the top of the passage. Then when a line near the end of the scene was especially funny, she added a second marker there. 

She has, of course, seen me sprinkle books liberally with post-it flags for years. She has started encountering my old markers as she reads books on her own (the first Harry Potter book, e.g.), and she'll sometimes ask me why I flagged something. But this is the first time I can remember her excitedly marking a scene on her own.

She probably has a future as a book reviewer, should she choose to accept it. [Shades of Charlotte's son, who has grown up with the Cybils in his household, and eventually became a judge, too.] Do other people's children use post-it flags to mark passages? 

© 2018 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook