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Reviews that Made Me Want the Book: Bastille Day Edition

Monday Night Visits: Blog Identity Crisis Edition

So I did my usual Sunday visits post yesterday, and that was all well and good. Except that today, interesting posts simply exploded across the Kidlitosphere. So I'm back with a few additions. (Perhaps feeling extra keen to report on the news, after Daphne Grab kindly included me in a Class of 2k8 round-up of recommended resources for kidlit industry news).

  • First up, my sympathies go out to Jules and Eisha, the proprietors of Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast. They are experiencing a bout of what I like to call "blog focus angst" (though they call it an identify crisis), and they write about it eloquently. Feeling worn down under the pressure of review books and the time required to write the long, thoughtful, link-filled reviews that are their trademark, they've decided to pull things back a bit. And who can blame them? I often feel the same way (especially when I actually look at the number of review books that I've accumulated recently), and it's clear from the comments that many other people do, too. I'm just glad that they'll still be keeping 7-Imp, and modifying it to fit their own busy lives a bit better. Colleen Mondor offers support at Chasing Ray, too.
  • And, in an ironic counterpoint, given the pressure that bloggers are putting on themselves to write thoughtful book reviews, another article (from the Guardian) takes on the print vs. online reviews debate. Liz B. offers up her customary insightful analysis of the piece at Tea Cozy. I think that a particularly important point Liz makes is that "there isn't a lot of print coverage of children's/YA books, so the blogosphere fills that vacuum."
  • Meanwhile, Kim and Jason from the Escape Adulthood site are suggesting, as their tip of the week, that readers "Spend 15 – 30 minutes doing something you love that you don’t often have the chance to do." As Kim points out, " If you cannot find 15-30 minutes on a regular basis to do something you love, then what’s the point?" Words to live by, I'd say. If our blogs, which started out as a way to talk about our love of reading, become work, then it's up to us to make them enjoyable again.
  • Kiera Parrott at Library Voice is starting a new reluctant reader pick of the week feature. First up is Jellaby. I think it's a great idea, and I'll be watching for her other recommendations. (Though, I hope that Kiera doesn't put pressure on herself with this weekly schedule - see identify crisis above).
  • Sheila at Greenridge Chronicles has a lovely post about what her family has learned from readalouds (including books by Laura Ingalls Wilder, J. K. Rowling, and Diana Wynne Jones).
  • And if you're looking to read to escape, Newsweek has an article about the rise of post-apocalyptic fiction aimed at kids. Lots of people are quoted, including Susan Beth Pfeffer (hat-tip to Sue for the link). The article, by Karen Springen, discusses the suitability of such books for kids, and also touches on "potent political messages" embedded in some of the books.
  • And, if you really want to escape, check out Franki Sibberson's list of books for kids who like Captain Underpants, at Choice Literacy (linked from A Year of Reading). Franki adds "if we are thinking of summer reading lists like this--connecting kids to books based on books they love, kids would have lots of ownership over what they read."
  • Walter Minkel shares a couple of summer literacy links from Reading Rockets at The Monkey Speaks.
  • And finally, Becky from Becky's Book Reviews weighs in on the Summer Reading List question. Becky points out (among other insights) that (on the topic of required reading) "You cannot force someone to enjoy something. Requiring something means it's work. And it doesn't take a genius to figure out that once something becomes work, it loses its ability to be fun. Work is tedious. It's mundane. It's something to be endured." And so we've come full circle with the 7-Imps post, in which Jules said: "I’ve also felt obligated to write about these books after I read them (even if I find fault with the writing), and I just really, REALLY want to read something and not have to report on it. To be thrilled about reading a book and then putting it down, instead of spending one or two hours to write about it….well, that tells me something. I feel like I’m doing to myself what we do to children when we give them programs like Accelerated Reader: Don’t just read and enjoy it. You must take a quiz now. I know I’M DOING THAT TO MYSELF." Definitely a common theme going on today - don't take something you enjoy and turn it into work. And especially don't do that to kids.

Here's wishing you all 15-30 minutes (at least) to do something that you enjoy.