Gail Gauthier's Early Reader Blog Tour
Children's Literacy Round-Up: July 6

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: July 2

I'm finally feeling a bit caught up after last weekend's ALA Conference, and I have a few links to share with you.

  • MotherReader posts about the first meeting of her Mother-Daughter Summer Book Club, in which the participants read Jenny Han's Shug (which I reviewed here). Pam said: "Most interesting for me was finding out that the realistic flavor of the book that I find so appealing was actually a turn-off to some of the girls. I loved the book because it took me back to that transition so clearly and represented that age so accurately. But these particular girls felt like they’re already living this life of friends and crushes and popularity — why would they want to read about it?" Fascinating, isn't it? Something for we adult reviewers of children's and young adult books to keep in mind. (hmmm .... do you think the acronym ARCYAB would catch on?)
  • Speaking of summer reading, The Book Whisperer, Donalyn Miller, writes about the dichotomy by which summer reading for adults consists of "fast-paced thrillers..., weepy beach blanket reads, and thick historical epics" while young adults are required to read improving fare. She says: "We must remind ourselves that readers who leave school and keep reading are those people who discover reading is personally valuable", suggesting that kids should be left to read what they enjoy during the summer. I know I did.
  • If you're looking for summer reading lists, here are a few good choices. Esme Raji Codell reviews We Are the Ship, and shares various other baseball books at PlanetEsme. Els Kushner suggests several "magical, timeless, enchanting novels for children are set during summer vacation" at Librarian Mom. In contrast, Charlotte has a list of "cool books with which to escape summer" at Charlotte's Library. Summer reading options for all! I have to say that personally, I find the summer vacation list the most enticing - it's nice to see The Penderwicks on the same page as their literary antecedents, the Melendy Family.
  • Jama Rattigan's Alphabet Soup has an illustration-filled interview with Marla Frazee (the talented illustrator who makes Clementine spring from the page). I especially enjoyed a photo of Marla's work studio, which looks like a secret little cottage in the woods.
  • For all you writers out there, Laurie Halse Anderson has issued a challenge for July. She says: "1. Commit to write for 15 minutes a day for the entire month of July. 2. Just do it." Sounds almost achievable, doesn't it? Laurie will have encouraging/check-in posts every day on her blog.
  • And, for anyone thinking about writing as a career, you might want to check out TadMack's recent post (OK, rant) at Finding Wonderland about the financial side of being a children's book author. She says: "Don't get me wrong: I love what I do. And if you want to, may you find the courage to write, too. Just understand that it may not be blindingly lucrative, and please be nice to the writers you know, who are sometimes taken for granted as the one in the group who should treat everyone to dinner or coffee because they're "rich." OK. Point taken.
  • Cheryl Rainfield has rounded up a huge list of contests by which you can win books for children and teens, as well as a couple that have e-book readers as prizes.
  • Via Sarah Weinman's blog, Confessions of an Idiosyncratic Mind, I learned that someone is publishing a Treasure Island prequel. It's not going to be a children's book, however. According to the Independent, "The author John Drake, a former biochemist and freelance TV producer, has spent years studying Treasure Island line by line, together with books and essays on 18th-century shipping and piracy. The book, Flint & Silver, is the first in a scheduled series of six, snapped up last year by Harper Collins. Mr Drake is currently negotiating with a US publishing house for the American rights."
  • Anna from the Literacy is Priceless blog recently recapped some family literacy activities from the PBS Kids Raising Readers site, including a shout-out to the WordWorld show. And speaking of public broadcasting, via my friend Alex, WBUR and NPR's On Point broadcast today was about "A new history of children's literature, and what it tells us about growing up". The program featured guest Seth Lerer, professor of English and comparative literature at Stanford University and author of Children's Literature: A Reader's History from Aesop to Harry Potter.

It's good to be back home, hanging around in the Kidlitosphere. Happy reading!