Give-Away: Piper Reed, the Great Gypsy
Children's Literacy Round-Up: Hokies, Cheerios, and the Love of Reading

Saturday Afternoon Visits: October 11

CybilslogosmallI'm still distracted by the Cybils and the baseball playoffs (Go Sox!), and my reviews have dropped off a bit, but I have saved up some Kidlitosphere links from this week.

Speaking of the Cybils, TadMack has an excellent graphic at Finding Wonderland. This is a visual, do click through to see it. Also, Sarah Stevenson has put together a gorgeous Cybils double-sided flyer that you can download from the Cybils site and print out. Say, if you were planning on attending a conference, and wanted to be able to tell people about the Cybils. You can find it available for PDF download here.

Lee Wind has a detailed post about the upcoming Blog the Vote event that he's organizing with Colleen Mondor. This is a nonpartisan event - the idea is to encourage people to vote, whatever their convictions.

At In Search of Giants, Aerin announced the winner of the contest that she did during Book Blogger Appreciation Week, based on my Reviews that Made Me Want the Book feature. Congratulations to Alyce of At Home with Books. Alyce chose Graceling as her prize.

At Guys Lit Wire, a. fortis published a list of "not just gross, but actually scary horror books" of interest to teens. My favorite from the list is The Shining by Stephen King. I also recently enjoyed World War Z (about zombies).

The Forgotten DoorJenny from Jenny's Wonderland of Books has a fabulous post about Alexander Key, one of my favorite authors. I recently reviewed Key's The Forgotten Door, and also recently watched the 1975 movie version of Escape to Witch Mountain. Jenny says: "While Key often shows children fleeing villains and in danger, there is always a happy ending with children returning home and winning out over their enemies. He also portrayed children with ESP and from other worlds." She includes a bio and a detailed list of books written and illustrated by Key (I didn't even know that he was an illustrator). For Alexander Key fans, this post is a huge treat. And I join Jenny in hoping that the upcoming (2009) Witch Mountain movie will spark a renewed interest in Key's work.

At I.N.K. (Interesting Nonfiction for Kids), Anna M. Lewis writes about VERY interesting nonfiction for kids: Graphic Novels. Anna notes (relaying feedback from a conference session that she attended) "A fifth- grade, reluctant reader would rather not read than carry a first-grader’s picture book… but, give him a graphic novel at his reading level and he reads… and still looks cool!". Good stuff. But I didn't know that graphic novels were classified as nonfiction in libraries.

Also at I.N.K., Jennifer Armstrong writes about the nature deficit: "more and more children staying inside, choosing electronic screens over not only books (our focus here) but over authentic experience of the natural world. It's a mounting crisis with implications for the environment and for children's health, for social networks and political movements, among other things." She'll be working with the Children and Nature network to help find books to combat this problem.

Betsy Bird v-blogs the Kidlitosphere Conference at A Fuse #8 Production.

The Longstockings have a nice post by Kathryne about getting started for very beginning writers. Kathryne offers several tips and also recommends books for writers. There are additional suggestions in the comments.

Liz Burns responds at Tea Cozy to a New York Times article by Motoko Rich about using videogames as bait to hook readers. The article quotes a reading professor who says that we need to do a better job of teaching kids how to read. Liz says: "My knee-jerk response to this is that it's not about teaching kids HOW to read; it's teaching kids to love reading". I could not agree more! Walter Minkel also responds to the Times article at The Monkey Speaks. Walter's interpretation is that "that media companies are now headed down that road that leads to a largely bookless future." This is an idea which I find too depressing to contemplate.

And speaking of the future of books, Audiobooker has a report about a new audiobook download company that sends books to people's cell phones. British novelist Andy McNab is the co-founder of the company, GoSpoken.

I ran across several responses to the recent Duke University study that found a link between reading a certain Beacon Street Girls book and weight loss. Maureen from Confessions of a Bibliovore says "I found it a fundamentally flawed study. Let me say this: it's one book. I'm the last person to say it's impossible that a book can change a kid's life, but this is pushing it." Carlie Webber from Librarilly Blonde says "I'm intrigued as to what it is about this particular Beacon Street Girls book that encouraged weight loss... at what point does a book make kids change their ways and can other books have similar effects? Where does a book like this become didactic?" Monica Edinger from Educating Alice says "Suffice it to say I’m NOT a fan of “carefully” crafting novels this way. In fact I’m skittish about bibliotheraphy in general." I actually did read and review the BSG book in question (Lake Rescue) back in 2006. Although I'm generally quite critical of books that are written to promote a particular message (regardless of whether I agree with the message), I gave this one a pass at the time, because I thought that the characters were sufficiently engaging. But I think it's a very tricky thing.

Newlogorg200Via HipWriterMama comes the news that "In celebration of Young Adult Library Services Association’s (YALSA’s) Teen Reed Week™, readergirlz (rgz) is excited to present Night Bites, a series of online live chats with an epic lineup of published authors." Vivian has the full schedule at HipWriterMama. The games begin on October 13th.

Laurie Halse Anderson opens up discussion on whether booksellers have a "need to further segment the children's/YA section of their stores to separate books that appeal to teens that have mature content and those that don't." If you have thoughts on this, head on over to Laurie's to share.

On a lighter note, Alice Pope is taking an informal poll to see who among her Alice's CWIM Blog readers is left-handed. I am. As will be our next President (either way).

Mary and Robin from Shrinking Violet Promotions are working on an Introvert's Bill of Rights. I'm kind of fond of "Introverts have the right to leave social events "early" as needed." You can comment there with your other suggestions. The SVP post also links to an excellent essay on introverts by Hunter Nuttall, whose blog I'm now going to start reading. Nuttall includes pictures of various famous introverts (I'm not sure who classified them as such, but it's still fun to see). I especially enjoyed a section that he did on "why introversion makes perfect sense to me", starting with "I don’t see the need for untargeted socialization". Hmm... I wonder who the famous left-handed introverts are, and how many of them have resisted "untargeted socialization".

Roger Sutton reports at Read Roger that "The complete Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards ceremony is now up for your viewing and listening pleasure." This, combined with the baseball playoffs, is almost enough to make me wish I still lived in Boston. But not quite...

Happy weekend, all!

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