Booklights Interview/Profile at the Reading Tub
Unite or Die: Jacqueline Jules & Jef Czekaj

Sunday Afternoon Visits: August 9: KidLitCon '09, Liar Cover Revisited, and Books in Space

I've been a bit out of the blogging loop this week, due to the presence of houseguests. But I'm slowly getting myself back to normal, and have some news to share with you from around the Kidlitosphere.

Kidlitosphere_button First and foremost in Kidlitosphere news, Pam Coughlan (MotherReader and Kidlitosphere Central founder) has announced the preliminary agenda for the Third Annual Kidlitosphere Conference (aka KidLitCon). A registration form is now available with full details. If you blog about children's or young adult books, or you're thinking of blogging about children's or young adult books, you should come. If you write or edit children's or young adult books, or you are a teacher, librarian, or literacy advocate, and you are thinking about dipping a toe into the Kidlitosphere, you should come, too. The conference will be held at the Sheraton Crystal City Hotel in Virginia on October 17th. I attended the conference the past two years, and I simply can't recommend it highly enough. It's going to be great!!

LiarThe other big news in the Kidlitosphere this week is that Bloomsbury responded to the huge outcry about the cover of Justine Larbalestier's upcoming young adult novel Liar. The publisher maintains that their original choice to put a white teen on the cover of a book about an African-American teen was "symbolic" (reflecting the character's nature as a liar), rather than a response to perceptions about the market for book covers showing people of color. Regardless, they have decided to change the cover to one more representative of the book, and I think that's great news (in no small part because people will no longer have to conflicted over whether to buy the book or not). I also find the whole thing to be an excellent demonstration of the power of the literary blogosphere. The new cover was first reported in Publisher's Weekly's Children's Bookshelf, and has since been commented upon pretty much everywhere. (See Justine's response here).

Also, if you're thinking of starting a blog (and especially if you are thinking of ways to make money from book blogging), I recommend checking out Liz B's recent piece at A Chair, A Fireplace and A Tea Cozy about the business of publishing and blogs. Specifically, Liz discusses the question of whether or not bloggers could accept advertising from authors or publishers without the integrity (and/or perceived integrity) of their reviews being compromised. Liz's own view on this is pretty clear: "I do not believe that basically becoming an employee/independent contractor of a publisher/publicist (let's be realistic, authors don't have that kind of money) would ultimately allow for a website/blog, in its entirely, to remain objective, critical, and uninfluenced by the publisher." I agree with her.   

Speaking of Liz, kudos to her for having a recent School Library Journal cover story with Carlie Webber, as announced here. It's called When Harry Met Bella: Fanfiction is all the rage. But is it plagiarism? Or the perfect thing to encourage young writers?

In excellent kidlit news, Camille reports at BookMoot that the young adult novel Airborn, by Kenneth Oppel, is currently in orbit around the International Space Station. According to a press release: "astronaut Robert Thirsk, currently aboard the International Space Station with fellow Canadian Julie Payette, has brought with him two books by Canadian authors – Airborn by Kenneth Oppel and Deux pas vers les étoiles by Jean-Rock Gaudreault." Having been saying for years that I think that adults should read children's books, I am thrilled by this high-profile example.

Last week's Poetry Friday roundup was at The Miss Rumphius Effect. Tomorrow's Nonfiction Monday roundup will be at MotherReader (updated to add direct link to the post here).

Also this week, Colleen Mondor is hosting a One-Shot blogging event in celebration of Southeast Asia. She says: "the basic rules are simple - you post at your site on a book either set in SE Asia or written by a SE Asian author and send me the url. I'll post a master list with links and quotes here on Wednesday."

I don't normally highlight blog birthdays in these roundup posts (because I read so many blogs - there are blog anniversaries happening all the time). But I did want to extend special congratulations to Tasha Saecker, who has now been blogging at Kids Lit for SIX YEARS. As Pam said in the comments, that's like being 40 in blog years. Tasha has demonstrated style, integrity, and a passion for children's literature all along the way. If you're thinking of starting a children's book blog, I encourage you to make a study of Kids Lit - Tasha will steer you right. Happy Birthday to Kids Lit.

I'll be back tomorrow with this week's Literacy and Reading News roundup. I'll also have a new post up tomorrow at Booklights.