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KidLitCon '09 Panel: Coming Together, Reaching Out, Giving Back

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: September 23

There is way too much going on around the Kidlitosphere for me to wait until the end of the week to share the news. Here are a few highlights:

Newlogorg200 Readergirlz announced their latest initiative for Teen Read Week: Read Beyond Reality. Here's a snippet: "Teen Read Week, a week-long celebration of literacy, is scheduled for Oct. 18-24, 2009, and will include live chats with top teen authors on, the most popular online reading community for teen girls... In support of this tremendous literary initiative, the readergirlz divas will host nine young-adult authors—eight of whom are nominees for the Teens’ Top Ten—throughout Teen Read Week." You can read the full press release here. There's also a downloadable post here, and a trailer here.

Betsy Bird at A Fuse #8 Production reports on the new and improved Guys Read website from National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Jon Scieszka. She says: "I'm talking new look, new blog, cool recommendations, and funny funny funny." Books are in categories like "how to build stuff" and "robots". 

Cybils2009-150pxThe Cybils blog remained active this week. On Monday, deputy editor Sarah Stevenson posted the latest Cybils organizer profile, this one featuring Susan Thomsen from Chicken Spaghetti, this year's MG/YA Nonfiction category administrator. Then today she posted the profile for our Easy Reader panel organizer, Anastasia Suen. The other big Cybils news is that we've started announcing panelists for the categories. Here, you'll find the list of panelists (for both rounds) for the Easy Reader and Short Chapter Books category. Our other amazing panels will be announced soon!

At Chasing Ray, Colleen Mondor has a new installment of her What A Girl Wants Series, in which she engages in discussion with a variety of young adult authors. This installment's theme is "because we are not all rich girls". Colleen says: "The great swath of the American public however have actual jobs - blue collar or white collar they simply go to work to get a paycheck. In teen literature this is often not part of the equation and it left me wondering what that means to so many kids who can not ignore the money or how they live because of it." A number of authors share smart, insightful responses.  

KidLitCon-badgeMotherReader announced the charity that will benefit from this year's KidLitCon raffle. She says: "This year I’ve turned to Donors Choose for our charity, and specifically to impoverished Washington, DC, schools. At this point I’ve selected two proposals to fund. I picked Literacy is Fun-damental because they need Spanish language books, which are hard to pick up at a discount or at a local book sale, and because the picture of the kids is soooo cute. I picked It All Starts With Reading! because they need titles for teens, and the picture of the empty bookcase is soooo sad." She's also accepting prize donations for the raffle, if anyone is interested. You can also see the updated list of people scheduled to attend, at the bottom of this post.

Nancy_Silhouette Angie from Angieville, one of my book selection kindred spirits, has a post up today about her favorite mystery series (something that I tackled last month). Of the seven she listed, I adore five of them (some were on my list, and some weren't, but I love them all). A sixth is a second series by an author I'm currently working my way through, so I'm delighted to hear that the other series holds up, too. And the seventh, well, clearly I'll have to check that one out. Because if Angie's taste matches this well with mine, how could I possibly not want to read that one, too. Click through to see her choices. (And don't you love the image, which I borrowed from Angie's post?)

At Moms Inspire Learning, Dawn Morris has a two-part interview with Terry Doherty from The Reading Tub. (Terry is, as regular readers know, my partner in the weekly children's literacy roundups). The interview is Dawn's launch of a new "Moms Inspire Moms" series. She talks with Terry about how and why Terry started The Reading Tub (a nonprofit designed to "make it easy for families to create a positive reading environment at home, find great books ... and make it accessible to EVERYONE!"), as well as Terry's personal experience in raising her daughter, Catherine, to be a reader. Then (in an echo of the paired interviews that were my favorite part of last week's Book Blogger Appreciation Week), Terry interviews Dawn about Moms Inspire Learning ("Simple Resources and Strategies to Inspire Lifelong Learning, Reading, and Leading"). Dawn shares tips for teaching kids to read, and also talks about inspiring kids to write. She even has a Read Aloud Recipe for a Garden of Reading. Very nice!

Quick hits:

  • Natasha from Maw Books has a very fun post about how she manages to blog with two small children in her house. It's a visual - click through to see. I also really liked her BBAW wrap-up post, in which she spotlighted several blogs that she learned about through the whole event.
  • The Brown Bookshelf is looking for submissions for their flagship 28 Days Later event. Their blog says: "We are looking for submissions of African American children’s authors who are flying under the radar of teachers, librarians, parents and anyone who considers themselves a gatekeeper to a child’s reading choices."
  • As reported by Lauren Barack in School Library Journal's Extra Helping, Thursday (the 24th) is National Punctuation Day.
  • Friday is the deadline to submit entries for the September Carnival of Children's Literature. Susan Taylor Brown is hosting, and asks for your favorite post of the month.
  • Elaine Magliaro shares a list of fall-themed picture books and poetry at Wild Rose Reader.
  • This week's Nonfiction Monday roundup was at Bookends. Also not to be missed, at Tea Cozy Liz B. shares a thank you post in honor of Nonfiction Monday creator Anastasia Suen.
  • I don't usually highlight author interviews, but I did especially enjoy Sherrie Petersen's recent interview of fellow Kidlitosphere member, and Any Which Wall author, Laurel Snyder.
  • This seems to be my week for highlighting interviews, because I was also pleased to see author Justine Larbalestier interview blogger Doret from TheHappyNappyBookseller (about young adult fiction featuring girls playing sports, complete with recommendations).
  • Karen at Teenage Fiction for All Ages reported earlier this week that the shortlists for the Booktrust Teenage Prize have been selected. Would you imagine? The Graveyard Book is on the list. Winners will be announced November 18th. Tasha Saecker also has the shortlist, with cover images.
  • Persnickety Snark is hosting an international celebration of young adult book bloggers. Link via Leila from Bookshelves of Doom.
  • Kidliterate has launched a new feature called Old Release Tuesdays, with videos highlighting older titles that Melissa and Sarah enjoy selling. I think it's a nice idea! 
  • Laurie Halse Anderson has an important post, written in response to recent attempts to remove two of her books (Speak and Twisted) from high school classrooms. I especially liked this part: "I used to get really angry at these things because I felt they were a personal attack on me. Then I grew up. Now I get angry because book banning is bad for my country. It is an attack on the Constitution and about the core ideals of America. It is the tool of people who want to control and manipulate our children."
  • Speaking of book challenges, Leila has an update to the recent Ellen Hopkins book challenge (which I mentioned last week), at Bookshelves of Doom.
  • And Donalyn Miller, the Book Whisperer, has some suggestions in honor of Banned Book Week, too. She recaps several recent challenges, and offers criteria for teachers "to prevent book challenges and parent complaints before they occur".

And that's it for today. I do have lots of reviews that I've starred in my reader, but I'm not sure when I'll have time for a "reviews that made me want the book" feature. Soon, I hope. Happy reading!