Lunch Lady: Jarrett J. Krosoczka
Children's Literacy Round-Up: October 5

Sunday Afternoon Visits: October 4: Cybils, Poetry Friday, KidLitCon, and Wild Things

I did a pretty thorough Kidlitosphere roundup on Wednesday (though some of you may have missed it, because I was having some temporary technical problems with my blog this week - apologies). Anyway, I have just a few additional links to share with you today.

Cybils2009-150px First up, the Cybils nomination process is going strong. As I write this, there have been more than 400 eligible nominations. There have been some great, great titles nominated. You can view the lists of nominated titles (complete with cover images, and the name of the person who nominated each book), here:

We've also been continuing to roll out profiles of Cybils organizers, lists of panelists, and introductions to the various categories. There are too many posts to link to - I recommend that you go to the Cybils blog, and check it out. You can also follow the Cybils on Twitter. Last, but not least, you can find some great tips for new Cybils panelists at Abby (the) Librarian.

At A Chair, A Fireplace and a Tea Cozy, Liz B. offers an introduction to Poetry Friday, and a thank you to PF founder Kelly Herold. (Liz also links to Susan Thomsen's previously written and definitive intro to PF). Fittingly, this week's Poetry Friday roundup is at Crossover, Kelly's new blog. Like Liz, I don't end up participating in Poetry Friday all that often these days. I have trouble with scheduled events, beyond my own roundups and PBS posts and so on. But I still think that Poetry Friday is one of the jewels of the Kidlitosphere, a weekly celebration of poetry, spread across a variety of different blogs, completely volunteer run, and fully democratic.

Ellen Hopkins continues to face book challenge drama. She says: "the superintendent of schools in Moore OK ... preemptively pulled all my books from all her schools “as a precaution.”" Nice. Don't even put the book banners to the trouble of mounting challenges - just remove everything. Maureen has a roundup of some other Banned Book Week links at Confessions of a Bibliovore. Colleen Mondor shares her thoughts on several related topics (with lots of discussion in the comments) at Chasing Ray.

At The Happy Accident, Greg Pincus has a great post about #kidlitchat, Twitter, and community. He explains the goal that he and Bonnie Adamson had in starting the weekly chats in the first place (to build community), and the benefits that are already coming out of these sessions. Like this one: "Each member of our individual networks sees our passion and, if they want, can see our community in action – sharing, laughing, supporting, learning. We can be emissaries for children’s literature as a group, far more than we can as individuals." How great is that?

Quick hits:

  • Pam Coughlan has some new details about KidLitCon at MotherReader, as well as links to some external articles that show why authors can't "afford not to invest in learning more about blogging, social media, and online presence."
  • Sherry has a new installment of her Saturday Review of Books at Semicolon. This is a regular Semicolon feature, in which a host of bloggers submit links to a review from the week (it's supposed to one review, but lots of people apparently link to all of these reviews). Anyway, it's a nice place for browsing.
  • At Literacy, families, and learning, Trevor Cairney has a detailed piece about the importance of historical fiction, and why children should be encouraged to read it. He gives lots of examples.
  • Monica Edinger links from Educating Alice to some points at the SLJ Heavy Medal blog on the Newbery Award, audience, and insensitivity. She calls it "Hard stuff, but important. Highly recommended."
  • Esme Raji Codell has a fun post at PlanetEsme highlighting "great new books about books and writing".
  • Abby (the) Librarian has a few more links in her Around the Interwebs post from Friday. Karen has still more links at Teenage Fiction for the Ages, in her Links from the Blogosphere post. And still more from Gwenda Bond at Shaken & Stirred and from Book Dads in their Weekend Wander.
  • There's a nice post at the ESSL Children's Literature Blog from Nancy O'Brien listing children's literature on multicultural families.
  • The featured author at Readergirlz this month is Libba Bray.
  • At 100 Scope Notes, Travis posts several Wild Things links. Are you interested in Where the Wild Things Are tattoos? I'll bet Betsy is. And just in case that's not enough Wild Things news for you, Elaine Magliaro links to a Boston Globe article about how Maurice Sendak made the world safe for monsters.
  • And in closing, my favorite blog post of the week. Laini Taylor posted photos of her husband, Jim di Bartolo, reading to their baby. She's looking straight at the book. She's smiling. The photos are perfect! Do click through. They'll brighten your day.

And that's all for today. Hope you've all been having a lovely weekend!