Children's Literacy Round-Up: November 2
Cookie Monster!

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: November 4: Kidlitosphere News and Views

It's been a pretty active week around the Kidlitosphere. Here are a few links for you.

Bigbird-hp Today is Sesame Street's 40th birthday. Happy Birthday to Cookie Monster, Oscar, and the rest of the crew. One of my earliest memories is of singing "C is for Cookie, that's good enough for me" in the car. According to this news release, "Google, an innovator in the world of technology, has partnered with Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, to create original “Google doodles.”  Starting today, Google will feature photographic depictions of the Sesame Street Muppets with the Google logo on its home page from November 4-10." Fun stuff!

Colleen Mondor has posted the latest installment in her "What a Girl Wants" series (a set of roundtable discussions that she's hosting with a panel of authors) at Chasing Ray. This week's topic is: mean girls in literature. Colleen asks: "did literature create the myth of mean girls or have the reality of mean girls created accompanying literature?" As usual in this smart series, the responses extend in a variety of intriguing directions.

Newlogorg200 The Readergirlz will be celebrating Native American Heritage Month for November, spotlighting Marlene Carvell's novel Sweetgrass Basket at readergirlz. In her customary organized manner, Little Willow has all the details.

At Pixie Stix Kids Pix, Kristen McLean takes on "the Amazon Vine brouhaha kicked off by Betsy Bird over at Fuse #8 last week", saying "I think this discussion has some larger implications for the industry, which is why it’s going to continue to get play." She begins by discussing the lack of transparency in the Amazon program, and moves on from there.

Picking up on another Betsy Bird article (her recent SLJ piece about KidLit blogs), Roger Sutton asks at Read Roger "whether or not there is such a thing as a blog-friendly book", if "some books more than others will appeal to people who like to blog about children's books." He also makes some interesting points about the usefulness (or lack thereof) of blogs for libraries researching for their book collections, in context of "The glory and the bane of book blogging is its variety".

Speaking of Betsy's SLJ article, Liz B. has a fun piece about the photo shoot for the cover at Tea Cozy. Betsy's article also inspired in librarian Ms. Yingling some philosophical musings on why she blogs. She also makes the excellent point that "The more good people we have commenting on books, the easier it is for the rest of us to keep on top of the huge number of new books that are coming out". 

Cybils2009-150px Anne Levy is running a new contest on the Cybils website related to NaNoWriteMo (where people try to write a whole book in November). Well, actually she links to a contest, and then also asks people to share 50 word blurbs from their NaNoWriteMo projects, for publication on the Cybils blog. Fun stuff! 

Mitali Perkins recently announced an ALA Midwinter Kid/YA Lit Tweetup. She says: "Coming to Boston for the ALA Midwinter conference? If you're a tweeting librarian, author, illustrator, publisher, agent, editor, reviewer, blogger, or anyone interested in children's and YA lit, join us on January 16, 2010 from 4-6 in the Birch Bar at Boston's Westin Waterfront Hotel." Still not enough to make me wish that I still lived in Boston as winter approaches, but this comes close...

Alltheworld It looks like blogging friend Liz Garton Scanlon is going to have her picture book, All the World (with Marla Frazee), included in the Cheerios Spoonful of Stories program next year. Congratulations, Liz! Liz shares some other good news for the book at Liz in Ink.

Sixth grade language arts teacher Sarah asked at the Reading Zone for "a few “words of wisdom” for a presentation" on reading aloud to middle school students. There's some good input in the comments. It's an inspiring post all around, actually.

Quick hits:

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission on purchases (with no additional cost to you).

Comments