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Posts from July 2013

Maya Was Grumpy: Courtney Pippin-Mathur

Book: Maya Was Grumpy
Author: Courtney Pippin-Mathur
Pages: 32
Age Range: 4-8 

Maya Was Grumpy is a delightful picture book written and illustrated by Courtney Pippin-Mathur. Young Maya wakes up one morning feeling grumpy, for no particular reason. Her Gramma coaxes Maya out of this bad mood by proposing an increasingly ridiculous series of activities. Though Maya resists, she is eventually won over. Like this: 

""Well then," said Gramma, "I guess that means no hunting for hippos after breakfast." 

"I never hunt for hippos," Maya grouched."

And on another page spread:

"Bathing baby elephants would probably be a bad idea today if you're grumpy," Gramma said.

Maya rolled her eyes."

And so on. Each page spread features a large-scale picture of Maya, her little twin brothers, and Gramma doing the proposed imaginary activity. A narrow panel to the right shows Maya's real-world response. Grumpy Maya is always depicted with enormously wild hair, and with her equally grumpy stuffed lion. The imaginary Mayas, however, wear fancy outfits and big smiles. Imaginary Maya's hair is big, but much more in control. It's like the hair is a proxy for Maya's mood - sometimes untameable and angry, and sometimes just bouncy. 

Although in a novel one tires of seeing ornate text attributions like "Maya grumbled", in this context, they work perfectly. Pippin-Mathur is able to introduce a bit of rich vocabulary, while keeping the book from being too repetitive. Active words like "squeezed" and "tickled" are shown in bold, making Maya Was Grumpy read-aloud-friendly.

But it's the bold illustrations (rendered in pencil, ink, watercolor, and "a little digital magic") that really stand out in Maya Was Grumpy. The backgrounds are use bold, bright colors. The imaginary scenes are filled with whimsy. And Maya's red-gold hair is practically a character in its own right. This is a book that kids are going to LOVE looking through. 

There are two other things that I like about this book. First of all, although it's about getting out of a bad mood, Maya Was Grumpy is not at all preachy. Maya's Gramma stays calm, and appeals to Maya's sense of humor, but she doesn't judge or even try to understand the reasons for the bad mood. This book just accepts that sometimes people have bad days, for no particular reason. I like that.

Second, I like that Maya's grandmother is her caregiver. The book doesn't make clear whether Gramma just watches the kids during the day, or whether they live with her, but this vagueness makes this a nice book for nontraditional families. Plus it's much more entertaining to see a grandmother happily sliding down the slide than a mother or father, I think. 

Maya Was Grumpy is a top-notch picture book, one that I highly recommend. I'm not sure whether my three-year-old will grasp this idea of generalized bad moods just yet, but I think that Maya Was Grumpy should be a great fit for 5 and 6 year olds. 

Publisher: Flashlight Press (@FlashlightPress)
Publication Date: March 11, 2013
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Literacy Milestone: Acting Out Books

LiteracyMilestoneAI've been getting a positive response to this little posts about my three year old's milestones on the road to literacy, so I'm planning to keep them coming. Here is the latest: Baby Bookworm has started acting out books. The book itself doesn't need to be anywhere nearby.

I first noticed this when I found her walking around the rug saying "Swishy swashy, swishy swashy! Stumble trip, stumble trip" (from We're Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen & Helen Oxenbury, of course).

Today I found her scolding her babysitter. I started to protest, but stopped when I realized that they were doing a scene from Fancy Nancy: The Fanciest Doll in the Universe by Jane O'Connor & Robin Preiss Glasser. It's a scene in which Nancy discovers that her little sister has written on Nancy's precious doll's stomach in permanent marker. Baby Bookworm likes to act the part of the outraged older sister, while her co-actor is forced to defend herself, in shrill tones ("But she wanted a tattoo"). Needless to say, it is pretty funny.

I've seen acting out stories suggested as a way to get kids excited about books. I just didn't realize that it could happen spontaneously. It is certainly something that I plan to encourage. Even if I have to put up with being scolded. (That doll wanted a tattoo. She said so.)

Do you have any literacy milestones to share? 

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon affiliate. 


Mojo: Tim Tharp

Book: Mojo
Author: Tim Tharp (@timtharp1)
Pages: 288
Age Range: 12 and up 

I'm always interested in finding more children's and young adult mysteries. So when I heard about Tim Tharp's Mojo, a YA murder mystery by a an author who previously won a National Book Award, I was interested. And Ms. Yingling liked it (and considers it edgy but still appropriate for middle schoolers), so I decided to give it a look. My own feelings about the book ended up being a bit more mixed. 

Mojo begins when high schooler Dylan finds classmate Hector Maldonado dead in a dumpster (this is not described very graphically). The police (after harassing Dylan and his friend Randy) quickly close the case, declaring Hector's death a drug overdose. Dylan doesn't buy it. When he continues to obsess about the lax police investigation, his best friend Audrey suggests that he instead focus on investigating the disappearance of the rich and pretty Ashton Browning (who attends a different school). Dylan, motivated in part by the $100,000 reward that Ashton's parents put up, and in part by the need to prove himself (and gain "mojo"), begins to investigate. 

Mojo is twisty and suspenseful. I was never completely sure what was going on. I like that Tharp addresses racism and homophobia (Audrey is gay), both in realistic ways. I like Dylan as a character. He's quirky but determined, and surprisingly loyal (even to Ashton, who he's never met). His relationships with Audrey and Randy are realistic. He admits freely that he does "carry a few extra pounds", and his passion for hamburgers is unabashed. He loves his parents, even though he doesn't let them in on what's really going on in his life. 

Dylan's voice is blunt, self-deprecating, and often funny. Like this:

"Audrey and I had to grab a seat in back, which was fine. I didn't want to stick out as the guy who only spent time with Hector in the Dumpster after he was already dead.

I'd never been to a Catholic funeral before. My parents aren't exactly into organized religion. On Facebook, under Religion, they entered spiritual. But I have to say this for the Catholics--they really know how to put on a show. And I don't mean that in any kind of disrespectful way. I don't usually call clothes garments, but the priest running the program had some mega-cool garments going on. The hat alone made you feel like, This is going to be serious." (Page 19-20)

Dylan is baffled at the notion that someone would turn in people who are in the country illegally, but he also is quick to leave Randy behind when he has the chance to hang out with people who are new and more interesting (which I thought was completely realistic). I also found realistic Dylan's struggles to get around to investigate without a car (particularly after he creates a rift with Audrey). 

So, there are a lot of things to like about Mojo. But, here's what bothered me about it. I'm going to try to talk about this without spoilers, but it's a bit tricky. Dylan is a fairly sharp kid. He's used to being picked on a bit at his rough and tumble public high school. But when Dylan becomes involved with several wealthy kids from Ashton's posh private school, he just ... believes everything that they tell him, despite warnings from Audrey and Randy that these rich aren't really his friends. I wanted to shake Dylan for being so dumb. Of course I've read a lot of books, and seen a lot of movies and television shows, so perhaps I'm more cynical than the target reader for Mojo. But I still found it difficult to enjoy the book because I just didn't find Dylan's reactions (particularly in the later part of the book) plausible. 

So there you have it. Mojo is a fairly edgy YA mystery, one that isn't afraid to take on issues of race, class, and discrimination, but never lets these things dominate over the suspenseful plot. Mojo features a strong protagonist, and lets that protagonist be overweight, without making a major issue out of it. Mojo didn't quite work for me, but I'm sure that there are lots of readers out there who will enjoy it. And it certainly fills a need for boy-friendly young adult mysteries. Librarians for middle school or high school will want to give this one a look.

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (@RandomHouseKids
Publication Date: April 9, 2013
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Seize the Summer! Read Aloud 15 Minutes or More Every Day

Summer Message 1 JPEGI'm helping the Read Aloud campaign to spread their message in support of reading aloud this summer. The image to the left is the first of several quick, visual messages that I'll be sharing over the next few weeks. This message is to SEIZE THE SUMMER!

Children who don't read during the summer months can see their reading levels slide significantly. Parents can help to combat this through the simple and pleasurable act of reading aloud to their kids. The Read Aloud campaign proposes that families read aloud for 15 minutes every day, to all children. They aim "to make reading aloud every day for 15 minutes the new parenting standard, and thereby change the face of education in this country."

But let's not just think of it like a prescription. We should be seizing the summer as an opportunity to show our kids just how enjoyable reading can be, together and separately. With kids out of school, and many parents taking extra vacation time, with families traveling together, and relatives visiting, there are so many opportunities to read aloud. Here are some ideas for reading aloud together:

  • Read books aloud during car trips (or use audiobooks if, like me, you can't read in the car). 
  • Read outside in a tent (or inside in a tent, if it's 100 degrees where you are this week).  
  • Sit at the base of a good climbing tree, and let your child listen and climb at the same time. 
  • Since you don't have to rush off to school, sit on the couch and read in your pajamas after breakfast.
  • Dig out your childhood favorites, and ask Grandma or Grandpa to read them to your child. 

Of course, it's not all about the reading aloud. While that's important for a number of reasons (see Read Aloud's graphic here), so is giving your child time to sit and read (whatever he wants). And so is letting your child see you sitting quietly reading (thus modeling the enjoyment of reading). 

Seize the summer! Read to your kids. Read in front of your kids. Buy your kids books. Go to the library. All of these things will help to get your child ready for school in the fall, while giving her a summer to remember in the meantime. 

Do you have any creative ideas for summer reading with kids? I would love to hear about them. You can also find lots of ideas at the Read Aloud Facebook Page, or my own Growing Bookworms Page.

Happy reading!  

This post © 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved.


20 Big Trucks in the Middle of the Street: Mark Lee & Kurt Cyrus

Book: 20 Big Trucks in the Middle of the Street
Author: Mark Lee
Illustrator: Kurt Cyrus
Pages: 32
Age Range: 3-6

20 Big Trucks in the Middle of the Street is a counting book aimed squarely at young truck fans. When an ice cream truck breaks down in the middle of his street, a young boy on a bike counts all of the trucks that stack up. Eventually, he is able to suggest a clever solution, one that makes use of one of the other trucks. After a bit of effort to get the adults to pay attention to his plan, the boy eventually triumphs. Naturally, there's ice cream to be had at the end.

Mark Lee's rhythmic text is clearly meant to be read aloud. Like this:

"A mail truck stops, so now there are two.
Their drivers don't know what to do.

Watch out! Two trucks are in the way.
They stop a third truck carrying hay."

I must admit that the text didn't always scan quite right for me, though. Like this:

"I start to count each truck I see.
First 1, then 2, and now there are 3."

In my opinion, the "and" shouldn't be there. I suppose the idea is to keep the text from being sing-songy. But for me, when you have two rhyming lines close in length, it makes sense to have the same number of syllables. Perhaps this is nit-picking...

I do like the fact that the boy counts to 20 (most picture books only make it up to 10), and the fact that many different kinds of trucks are introduced. Kids who can't get enough information about trucks will be happy reading this book, and will learn their numbers above 10, too. 

Kurt Cyrus's illustrations use a muted, bedtime-friendly palette. The trucks are shown via a variety of perspectives, with the yellow-helmeted boy a constant presence through the pages. Cyrus's people are secondary to the trucks, sometimes shown without details filled in. But I like that he includes a range of ethnicities and body shapes. One of the police officers who helps with the traffic jam is a woman, which I thought was a nice, subtle confounding of expectations. I also like the fact that the boy is apparently on his own, on his bike (with helmet), out in the neighborhood. Free range.

The storyline in 20 Big Trucks reminds me a bit of Truck Stuck, a 2008 picture book by Sallie Wolf and Andy Robert Davies. That one is a story-based picture book, though, while this one is more of a rhythmic counting book for younger kids. For a counting book aimed at the truck-fan audience, 20 Big Trucks in the Middle of the Street also offers a bit of a story, and a fun glimpse of a city neighborhood in chaos. I think it would make a nice classroom or library read-aloud, and I will use it at home to help my daughter learn her numbers. 

Publisher: Candlewick (@Candlewick)
Publication Date: June 11, 2013
Source of Book: Review copy from Regal Literary

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


The Beginner's Guide to Running Away from Home: Jennifer LaRue Huget

Book: The Beginner's Guide to Running Away from Home
Author: Jennifer LaRue Huget (@jhuget)
Illustrator: Red Nose Studio
Pages: 40
Age Range: 4 - 8 

The Beginner's Guide to Running Away from Home is a tongue-in-cheek story about how and why kids should run away from home, told from the perspective of a young boy. Parents needn't worry, however. Things turn out ok. 

Parenting aside: In retrospect, I wish that my daughter hadn't been with me when I opened the mail today. She insisted on reading this book immediately. And my gut feel is that she's not old enough to understand it. Now, we read lots of books that she's not technically old enough for. I am certainly not a stickler for age range. But I don't really love the idea of a book putting the idea of running away from home into her head. I think that she was baffled by the whole thing (she is similarly baffled by books about adoption. "But why?"). But now she knows, at age 3, that running away from home is something that kids think about. Ah well. I guess she would have come to it eventually.

But back to the book. Red Nose Studio's illustrations are unique and distinctive. They are "hand-built, three-dimensional sets shot with a Canon digital SLR camera grafted onto the back of a Horseman 4x5 camera. The line art was drawn with graphite on paper." So basically there are photos of little dioramas of clay people. I think it's a very cool style. Sort of a modern take on the Rankin and Bass Christmas specials from the 1970s. But ... the people all seem highly unattractive to me, including the protagonist. The baby is generally open-mouthed and screaming, and the older brother looks positively evil. My daughter seemed to enjoy these illustrations, and I think that they are interesting, but I personally don't care for them at all. 

Huget's text, however, is quite funny. Like this:

"You're too grown-up for a stuffed animal, but take your favorite one anyway. That will show your parents you mean business.

And you'll need a pillow and a blanket. But no pajamas. Out on your own, you get to sleep in your clothes. 

Save room for a bow and arrow. In case there are bears." 

And this:

"You're ready to storm out of the house!

Stomp your feet and make lots of noise.

Then holler that line you practiced earlier. See if you can work in a little sob."

It's all from the perspective of the put-upon kid. He's not as cute as his baby sister. He doesn't get the privileges that his older brother does. And when his mom throws out his collection of old candy wrappers - look out! 

I like that the boy comes to his own realization about heading back home after he runs away. There's no convenient third party that talks him into it, or anything like that. His parents, wisely, let him go, trusting that he won't get too far. 

The Beginner's Guide to Running Away from Home takes a classic, universal theme and adds irreverent humor and eye-popping illustrations. I think it will fly off the library shelves this summer. I think that it's most suitable to the older end of the picture book range, six to eight year olds, who will be best able to relate to the issues discussed. 

Publisher: Schwartz & Wade (@RandomHouseKids
Publication Date: June 25, 2013
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Amelia Bedelia: 50th Anniversary Edition

Book: Amelia Bedelia (50th Anniversary Edition)
Author: Peggy Parish
Illustrator: Fritz Siebel
Pages: 40
Age Range: 4-8 

I remember the Amelia Bedelia books from my childhood. Doesn't everyone? I mainly remember the silliness of this maid who took everything literally, and the types of mishaps that resulted. HarperCollins recently sent me the 50th anniversary edition of the first book. 

Re-reading the original Amelia Bedelia, I still find it  entertaining. The overall premise, the mishaps that result when someone takes everything literally, remains relevant today. Some of the examples in this first book are a bit dated (does anyone still talk about "drawing the drapes" or even "dressing a chicken"?) but at most will require a bit of explanation to young readers. And the pictures (Amelia Bedelia sketching the drapes, or "putting out" a bunch of lightbulbs on the drying rack) will still induce giggles. 

What remains timeless is Amelia Bedelia's boundless cheerfulness, and her willingness to do whatever she is asked, even if it doesn't seem very logical to her ("Those towels are very nice. Why change them?"). Kids of all ages will also appreciate the way that Amelia Bedelia wins over the Rogers', despite her shortcomings as a maid, via her skill in making pie. 

The Amelia Bedelia 50th anniversary edition would pair well with Imogene's Antlers by David Small. A number of the other original Amelia Bedelia stories (with some modifications, perhaps, I'm not sure) are still available as I Can Read books. In 2009, a kid version of Amelia Bedelia was introduced. She now appears in both I Can Read books and chapter books, written by Peggy Parish's nephew, Herman Parish. A handy timeline at the end of the 50th anniversary edition shows the changes in Amelia Bedelia's portrayal over time. I'm not sure what Peggy Parish would think of a kid version of Amelia Bedelia, but books featuring a child are obviously more relevant to kids today than those featuring a uniformed maid. And the new books maintain Amelia Bedelia's core trait. She takes everything literally, leading to comic mishaps. The fact that that kids are prone to such verbal misunderstandings is clearly timeless.

As a side note, I also loved Peggy Parish's series of mysteries for slightly older kids, about Liza, Bill, and Jed. Though I had to check Wikipedia for the kids' names, I remembered titles like Clues in the Wood and Key to the Treasure. These are sadly out of print (hello - ebook reissue, anyone?). These were among the formative books that left me with a lifelong love of mysteries. I can still picture the shelf that they were kept on in my elementary school library. 

But back to Amelia Bedelia, I'm personally glad that one can still buy the original story. The 50th anniversary edition includes some lovely end material about Peggy Parish, Fritz Siebel, and Amelia Bedelia. Adult fans of the original books will enjoy this anniversary edition. And I think that many of them will like the idea of buying easy readers and early chapter books featuring a young, modern-day Amelia Bedelia. It says a lot about the strength of Amellia Bedelia's character that she can survive such a significant transformation. 

Publisher: Greenwillow Books (@HarperChildrens)
Publication Date: January 29, 2013 (this edition). Originally published in September of 1963. 
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Growing Bookworms Newsletter: July 2

JRBPlogo-smallToday I will be sending out the new issue of the Growing Bookworms email newsletter. (If you would like to subscribe, you can find a sign-up form here.) The Growing Bookworms newsletter contains content from my blog focused on children's and young adult books and raising readers. There are 1701 subscribers. Generally, I send out the newsletter once every two weeks. 

Newsletter Update: In this issue I have five regular book reviews (one picture book and four middle grade novels) and one announcement / plug for a young adult novel written by a friend. I also have two posts with children's literacy and reading-related links that I shared on Twitter, an infographic from Education.com about avoiding summer slide, and a quick post documenting one of Baby Bookworm's literacy milestones. Not included in the newsletter this time around, I shared:

As I mentioned last time, Terry Doherty, Carol Rasco, and I are taking a bit of a break from the children's literacy and reading roundups for the summer, but we'll continue to share reading links on Twitter. Look for the #litRdUp hashtag for items of particular interest. 

Reading Update: In the past 3 weeks, I finished 1 novel for middle grade readers and 3 novels for young adults. I read: 

  • Donna Gephart: Olivia Bean, Trivia Queen. Delacorte Books for Young Readers. Middle Grade. Completed June 19, 2013.
  • Sarah Zettel: Dust Girl (American Fairy Trilogy, Book 1). Random House Books for Young Readers. Young Adult. Completed June 19, 2013.
  • Sarah Zettel: Golden Girl (American Fairy Trilogy, Book 2). Random House Books for Young Readers. Young Adult. Completed June 27, 2013.
  • Charlie Higson: The Sacrifice (An Enemy Novel). Disney Hyperion. Young Adult. Completed June 28, 2013.

I'm currently reading The Caged Grave by Dianne K. Salerni. I'm just about finished listening to Clockwork Princess (Book 3 of the Infernal Devices trilogy) by Cassandra Clare on MP3. I have several nonfiction titles queued up, including the brand-new seventh edition of The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease (a book I think all parents should read). 

Baby Bookworm is reading a little bit of everything these days. I did have a happy Mommy Bookworm moment the other day that I wanted to share with you. We were in the car for the hour plus drive home from Monterey. Baby Bookworm sat in her car seat for quite a while, quietly "reading" aloud to herself from various books (including The Berenstain Bears Go Green). I thought: "We are doing something right." 

She also had her baby cousin visiting recently, and was very excited to read aloud to him. She "read" him No No Yes Yes by Leslie Patricelli, carefully running her fingers over the words as she said "No, no" and "Yes, yes". She also had fun picking out a basket of baby books for his room. Good times!

How about you? What have you and your kids been reading and enjoying? Thanks for reading the newsletter, and for growing bookworms. Wishing you lots of summer reading, and, for those of you in the US, a happy and safe July 4th. 

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved.  You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Hug! and Peek-a-boo!: Magnetic Arms books by Ben Mantle

Books: Hug! and Peek-a-boo!
Author: Ben Mantle
Pages: 16 each
Age Range: 1-3

Tiger Tales Press recently released these two "Magnetic Arms" board books by Ben Mantle. For each book, arms reach out from the back cover, and wrap around to the front of the book. In Hug!, the mother bear's arms hug the baby.

In Peek-a-boo! (though you can't see this on the cover image to the left), hands cover the rabbit's eyes. In both cases, the arms are very lightly magnetized. They stay closed on their own, but are relatively easy for small fingers to open. They work as bookmarks, too. 

Both texts are quite simple. but more vibrant and active than the covers suggest. Hugs! celebrates a variety of types of animal hugs, like this:

"Hooray for hugs! They're so much fun.
There's a hug for everyone.

How about a squashy, squeezy,

twisty, tangly,
easy breezy,

... HUG!"

Where the ... represents two other rhyming page spreads showing different kinds of hugs. In the above example, different fonts are used for the adjectives, reflecting the meaning of each word. For example, "tangly" is shown with a twisted spiral font. and "squashy" has the letters all squashed together. 

Each page includes a colorful, not particularly representational, picture of a different type of animals hugging. The "twisty, tangly" hug involves two giraffes with their long necks twisted together. "Small and snug" (in small font) shows two mice hugging. And so on. The animals are clearly recognizable, though not always realistically colored. 

I like the energy of this book, with it's varied, bold fonts and assorted animals. The text is a bit sing-songy, though. It's not a book that parents will love reading aloud over and over again. But it's still a fun one for toddlers. 

Peek-a-boo! is quite similar. except that the pictures show different types of animals playing peek-a-boo. Generally, the right-hand page of each spread shows glimpses of a hiding animal, while that animal is revealed, and named on the left-hand side of the next page. The author again uses vibrant adjectives in varied fonts, and includes cute, if not quite realistic, animals. My favorite page was the "funny, bouncing bunnies in their underwear!"

Both Hug! and Peek-a-boo! are clearly designed to appeal to the youngest of readers. The magnetic arms add just a touch of interactivity, and also reinforce the very idea of hugging. 

Publisher: Tiger Tales Books (@TigerTalesBooks)
Publication Date: March 1, 2013
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

FTC Required Disclosure:

This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook