Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: June 20
The Prince of Venice Beach: Blake Nelson

News Release: Historic Kate Greenway Medal Win for This Is Not My Hat

From Candlewick:

Jon Klassen's This Is Not My Hat becomes the only book to win both the Kate Greenaway and Randolph Caldecott Medals

June 23, 2014 (Somerville, MA): Candlewick Press is delighted to announce that Jon Klassen has won the 2014 Kate Greenaway Medal for Illustration for his picture book This is Not My Hat.

Published by the Walker Books Group – including Candlewick Press in the US and Walker Books in the UK – Jon Klassen’s This is Not My Hat will go into the history books as the first ever title to win both the UK’s highest illustration honor with the Kate Greenaway Medal, and also win the most prestigious award for children’s book illustration in the US, the Randolph Caldecott Medal, which was awarded in 2013. 

In addition, the Greenaway Medal for This Is Not My Hat marks the tenth Greenaway Medal for Walker Books, a feat unmatched by any other publisher, positioning Walker as the home of the very best in illustrative publishing.

Karen Lotz, Group Managing Director of the Walker Books Group said of the win, “Jon Klassen’s cunning hat thief stole our hearts at Walker long ago, and we couldn’t be more thrilled that he has now stolen the hearts of the 2014 Greenaway committee in this historic win. We are particularly proud to be the global publisher of the first creator to win both the Randolph Caldecott Medal and the Kate Greenaway Medal for the same book. What on earth will the extraordinarily talented Mr. Klassen do next? Watch this space!”

On winning the CILIP Kate Greenaway, Jon Klassen said, "Winning this award is hugely encouraging. Making a book, you're kind of going out on a limb in the belief that what you think of as a satisfying story is the same as what other people think of as a satisfying story. This doesn't mean everything in the story turns out alright for everybody, but you, as a storyteller, try and make sure it ends the way the story should end. Any audience, children included, take reassurance from that. Storytelling is an act of community, of looking at one another afterward and agreeing that we enjoyed it, or not, whether the story itself portrays happiness or doom. The hope is found when we agree we liked it, and I'm so glad you liked this one."

"Making picture books with Jon is like sky diving," says Liz Bicknell, editorial director. "Jon says, 'Okay, guys, I think this parachute's gonna open.' His art director Ann Stott and I look at each other, laugh, and JUMP OUT OF THE PLANE. So far, we've been landing very nicely. Thanks, Jon!"

 

Comments