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Posts from July 2015

Literacy Milestone: Making Signs

NoLittleBrothersAllowedThe other day my daughter called me into the playroom to see a "fort" that she and her babysitter had constructed out of foam floor tiles. She was especially pleased about the sign taped up by the entrance: "No Little Brothers Allowed" (shown to left). 

She does not actually have any little brothers, nor any on the horizon. We do have a family friend who pretends to be her little brother sometimes. His response to a photo of the sign was that little brothers can't read anyway. This she thought was hilarious. But the sign remains prominently displayed. 

She did have help with spelling the words on the sign. And clearly she needs more practice with the spacing of words. But I think it's a milestone because she's realized that she can use words to publicly express her preferences (even if they are imaginary preferences). This milestone probably owes a debt of gratitude to a book we've read a number of times: The Berenstain Bears: No Girls Allowed

Did your children put up signs around the house as they were learning to read and write? I'm expecting: "Do Not Enter, Mom and Dad" on her bedroom door one day. (Or, more likely, just "Do Not Enter, Mom.) But not quite yet... 

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through affiliate links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).


Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: July 10

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. Topics this week include Shirley Hughes, book awards, book lists, nonfiction picture books, summer books, the Cybils awards, 30 million-word gap, reading choice, growing bookworms, reading aloud, fathers reading, baseball, writing, schools, and libraries. 

Awards

Shirley Hughes is the first winner of the @Booktrust Lifetime Achievement Award - @TelegraphBooks http://ow.ly/PiurV 

Whom To Thank? Considering The Caldecott/Newbery Acceptance Speeches by two-time Newbery Committee member @fairrosa http://ow.ly/Piubd  

Book Lists

Inspiring People From History--A Collection of Picture Books recommended by @frankisibberson http://ow.ly/Ppats  #BookList

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: Fascination with nests and eggs | #BookList from @CarrieGelson http://ow.ly/PmpGG 

Summertime Books: Picture Books for A Day at the Beach from @randomlyreading http://ow.ly/PfbxI 

Who knew there were so many? @mrskatiefitz has compiled a #BookList of 12 Picture Books about Frogs & Toads http://ow.ly/PlzBA 

Shoo, fly: @HornBook identifies the latest trend in #kidlit| Flies are everywhere. http://ow.ly/Pfc0K 

Three Early Chapter Books for Readers Gaining Independence, recommended by @cathymere http://ow.ly/PiuHt  #kidlit

Shark Week reading for kids (picture book to YA), a @HornBook #BookList by Katie Bircher http://ow.ly/PmpbL 

For July 4th: books that explore what it might be like to grow up in Washington DC by @bkshelvesofdoom @KirkusReviews http://ow.ly/PaNlQ 

The Best Books of 2015 So Far, according to @bookriot staff (w/ brief reviews). Includes some #YALit http://ow.ly/PlvKe 

List of the Week @yainterrobang is Queer #YALit Fantasy / Sci-Fi, books by @malindalo @AdamSilvera + more http://ow.ly/PpmbU  

#SummerReading #YALit that's entertaining w/out being fluffy + complex w/out feeling like homework from @BostonGlobe http://ow.ly/PpIPj 

Cybils

On the #Cybils blog: #BookList Fun: Cybils Authors We Can’t Stop Reading by Jennifer Donovan @5M4B ow.ly/Ppay9 

Events + Programs

Closing the 30 Million-Word Gap | @shbayliss profiles the efforts + upcoming book of @DrDanaSuskind in @sljournal http://ow.ly/Pp8EE  

The Best Way to Keep Kids Reading Over the Summer is to let them choose what they want to read: @FirstBook http://ow.ly/Pisdr 

Writers' New Project Will Send LGBT #YALit to Libraries + Shelters in all 50 states, reports Sarah Selzer @Flavorwire http://ow.ly/PpIhS 

Growing Bookworms

Study says reading aloud to kids, more than talking, builds literacy (rich language) @EdSource http://ow.ly/PplY8  http://ow.ly/PplY9  

Raising Kids Who Love Reading, Devour Books Voraciously, and Practically Beg for a Trip to the Library @DrSuzanneGelb http://ow.ly/Pp7ub 

#RaisingReaders: Give Dad a Turn doing the chapter book read-alouds. Here's @SunlitPages experience: http://ow.ly/PfgMs 

Book Rotation: Organizing and Using Books for Kids, tips from @growingbbb http://ow.ly/PfaHZ 

Fun Ways to Incorporate #Literacy into your Summertime Activities, from Adventures in Literacy Land http://ow.ly/Pf9v3 

Early #Literacy in Everyday Places: Baseball Game by @mrskatiefitz (I also often use baseball to practice math) http://ow.ly/PaNuw 

Kidlitosphere

Satisfy your #kidlit news fix with: Fusenews: [Enter Obligatory Winnie-the-Pooh/James Bond Pun Here] — @fuseeight http://ow.ly/PaO0M 

Where Do You Go to Find Your Reading Community? asks @jennwalker72 @NerdyBookClub (I suggest #KidLitCon) http://ow.ly/PaNyq  

On Reading, Writing, Blogging, and Publishing

Top writing tips for new children's authors from top editors @GdnChildrensBks | e.g. avoid overwriting http://ow.ly/PpmCU  

The English Teacher Who Almost Quit Reading, w/ tips for getting back reading groove by @theVogelman @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/PfafZ 

Parenting

Screen Addiction Is Taking a Toll on Children: Jane E. Brody @NYTimes http://ow.ly/PiiKb  

Schools and Libraries

NEA Approves National School Library Study, measuring student access | @Llauren @sljournal http://ow.ly/Pp7Uz  @NEAToday 

How to Break the Rules Gently – Creating Experiences that Protect the Love of Learning | @PernilleRipp http://ow.ly/PlyBp  #teaching

Life After No Child Left Behind, overview by @aliaemily @TheAtlantic via @PWKidsBookshelf #education http://ow.ly/PpIve 

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Disney Little Golden Book

Book: Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Disney Little Golden Book
Author: Diane Muldrow
Pages: 96
Age Range: 12 and up

I enjoy the "Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Little Golden Book" series, despite the fact that I'm never really sure who the books are meant for. Nostalgic adults, I suppose. Diane Muldrow goes through various illustrations from the wide array of Little Golden Books, and constructions inspirational / entertaining collections on various themes (love, Christmas, etc.). I've gotten a kick out of flipping through these books. But Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Disney Little Golden Book is definitely my favorite. 

Muldrow starts with "Does your life seem more "ho-hum" ..." (image of Snow White scrubbing a floor) "or you're unsure of your direction in life" (image of Alice in Wonderland, lost). She suggests encouragement "because magic is all around us", and proceeds to celebrate things like friendship, music, and dancing, all through the many Disney-themed Little Golden Books.

While I'm not specifically familiar with all of the books that are included, they are mostly either from classic stories that I know or from Disney movies that I've seen. Thus I was able to place nearly all of the illustrations, without needing the tiny attributions included in the lower corner of each page. Many of them, like Simba and his dad looking up at the stars, and Boo leading Sully by the hand, made me smile. 

The bottom line is if you are a fan of Little Golden Books, or you are a fan of Disney movies and stories, you'll find much to smile about in Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Disney Little Golden Book. And although these books aren't really meant as picture books for kids, I do plan to read this one with my daughter. I think she's going to love identifying all of the movies. Perhaps she'll find, as I did on reading this, that she leaves the book feeling hopeful and inspired. A happy thing all around. Recommended. 

Publisher: Golden Books (@RandomHouseKids
Publication Date: July 28, 2015
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through affiliate links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).


The Hired Girl: Laura Amy Schlitz

Book: The Hired Girl
Author: Laura Amy Schlitz
Pages: 400
Age Range: 12 and up

When I started reading The Hired Girl, by Laura Amy Schlitz I found myself unable to put it down. This was not because the story was suspenseful in the traditional sense. The Hired Girl is realistic historical fiction, not some modern-day thriller. No, my inability to set the book aside was because the narrator's voice was so compelling. I had to know what would happen next to her

The Hired Girl is told in the form of journal entries by 14-year-old Joan, a virtual domestic slave for her taciturn father and three rough older brothers. Joan's story begins in June of 1911, as she learns that she will not be allowed to return to school the following year. Joan is a girl who loves, who lives for, books and writing, but lives in a print-starved, dreary farming household. She only owns three books, gifts from a sympathetic teacher. Joan's life goal, seemingly unachievable now, is to become a teacher, as her deceased mother wished. When her father pushes her too far, with an act of deliberate cruelty, Joan runs away to Philadelphia, where she hopes to become a "hired girl". 

It's not that Joan is perfect, by any means. The reader (particularly the adult reader) can see her making mistakes, even as she makes them. She is impulsive and interfering, and has airs far above her station. She is melodramatic and naive. But she's also bright and determined, and not afraid of hard work. She's religious, seeking to follow her mother's Catholic faith, but struggles realistically with various sins (such as her inability to forgive her father). But above all, she is real. I ached for her, and cringed for her, and shook my head when I saw her doing something she shouldn't. I cared about Joan, and that kept me reading. 

But there is more to The Hired Girl than a great character. Schlitz immerses the reader in upper crust, 1911 Philadelphia, from ladies having bridge parties to the Pratt Library to the price of various clothing items in a department store. The Wizard of Oz is a new book that children are "crazy for" (even if it is considered "trash"). And the Impressionists are "as good as the Old Masters any day, but they aren't much appreciated because some of them are still alive, and the ones that are dead aren't dead enough."

The Hired Girl is also an in-depth exploration of Judaism vs. Catholicism. The family that Joan ends up working for is Jewish - she is their "Shabbos goy, which is a Christian who does the work that Jews aren't supposed to do on Shabbos." Joan learns about Jewish traditions and customs (and about the concept of anti-Semitism), even as she is also taking instruction from a Catholic priest on her afternoons off. There are several philosophical discussions between Joan and the patriarch of the Rosenbach household concerning questions like (paraphrasing) "which is the true religion?" and "do good Christians have an obligation to teach others about Jesus?". 

Because Joan's first-person perspective is flawless, the information conveyed never feels remotely like information-dumping. Rather, the reader is learning with Joan. The religious and philosophical content is lightened by Joan's interactions with the vain but likable daughter of the household, a young nephew, and a cat or two. 

I'm not entirely sure that I find all of the interactions in The Hired Girl realistic (the Rosenbach's are awfully patient with the mistakes and presumptions of a $6 a week hired girl). But I still enjoyed every word. I flagged many passages. Here are a couple of favorites, to give you a feel for Joan's voice:

"Father laughed. It wasn't a natural sound, or a happy one. When most people laugh, it's like water splashing over the lip of a pitcher. The thing happens easily , and it wants to go on. Father's laugh was like coughing up something from the back of his throat." (Monday, June the nineteenth, 1911)

"The truth is, most of the time, I don't of myself as the hired girl. I think of myself as somebody disguised as the hired girl. After all, I'm not going to be a servant all my life. It's temporary. At some point I'm going to get an education and become a schoolteacher, just as Ma planned. (Monday, July the twenty-fourth, 1911)

"The truth is, I think ball games are unfeminine. I believe ladies should vote and be doctors and maybe even be President, but they should stay tidy and not perspire. Most of my life, I've had to get dirty and perspire, but I haven't liked it. If you ask me, it's silly to run after a ball, and that kind of silliness ought to be left to the men." (Tuesday, August the first, 1911)

See what I mean? Isn't she great? I don't think you can tell from these passages, but I was able to see Joan's writing and vocabulary improve as the book progressed, as she read additional books. 

There's always a balancing act when reading young adult books about characters from other time periods, particularly women. You want the author to be true to the time period, but you also want the character to be relatable to modern-day readers. I think that Schlitz manages this nicely. Joan is not as abject as one might expect a hired girl with no prospects to be (which is what makes her interesting). Yet she also has some very old-fashioned (to us) ideas about gender roles and marriage and the like.

The Hired Girl is a lovely addition to the ranks of historical fiction, one that I hope is widely read. The fact that Laura Amy Schlitz won the 2008 Newbery Award for Good Masters, Sweet Ladies (also historical fiction) should help. Fans of Schlitz's A Drowned Maiden's Hair: A Melodrama will also enjoy The Hired Girl (though that latter is aimed at a slightly older audience). Bottom line? I expect big things from The Hired Girl. I look forward to re-reading it one day, when my daughter is old enough to appreciate it. Highly recommended. 

Publisher: Candlewick 
Publication Date: September 8, 2015
Source of Book: Review copy from the publisher

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through affiliate links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).


Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: July 3

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. Topics this week include Latino Book Awards, book lists, diversity, read-aloud books, speculative fiction, summer reading, time travel, growing bookworms, phonics, literacy programs, writing, ebooks, James Patterson, and teaching boys.

Awards

The 2015 International Latino Book Awards Winners, picture book to #YALit, reported at @LatinosInKidLit http://ow.ly/OWR2v  #DiverseBooks 

Book Lists (including several diverse book lists)

A Roundup of Kid's Book for Gay Pride, picture book to #YALit from @randomlyreading http://ow.ly/OWRxd  #DiverseBooks

15 Engaging First Grade Read Alouds from @momandkiddo w/ classic + newer selections http://ow.ly/OWQxw  #kidlit

12 Kid-Approved Books for Advanced 4th + 5th Grade Readers | by @nesskari from @bookopolis for @ReadBrightly http://ow.ly/P3PnK  

18 Classics to Read with Today's Kids, selected by Alysa @Everead | Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Mary Lennox + more http://ow.ly/P6jPm 

A Tuesday Ten @TesseractViews | Hispanic/Latino Speculative Fiction for Kids http://ow.ly/P37hi  #kidlit #DiverseBooks

Here Comes the Fun: Sunny Summer Reads for Kids, selected by Kate Hannigan @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/OQYkO 

Guest post @readingtub | Summer Laurie's #SummerReading List (#kidlit + #YAlit perfect for summer) http://ow.ly/P36VD 

A list of time travel books, middle grade through #YALit, with #diversity from @charlotteslib http://ow.ly/OWRXH 

Diversity

Diverse Characterization Matters | Ann Dye @HMHKids on how kids need to read about chars they can relate to http://ow.ly/P0x7Z  @CBCBook 

Events + Programs

Talk1ALSC launching the Babies Need Words Every Day: Talk, Read, Sing, Play public-awareness campaign w/ posters http://ow.ly/P35GG  @alscblog (Image shown is just an example - follow the link to ALSC to download up to eight larger, printable posters.)

Turning Prisons into Reading Centers by unPrison Project founder Deborah Jiang-Stein for @CBCBook http://ow.ly/P0xKi 

New Anthology w/ @realjohngreen + Others Funds #Literacy Nonprofit @IndyReads + Celebrates Local Indianapolis Authors http://ow.ly/OQXFU 

Growing Bookworms

10 Phonics Readers for Early Reading recommended by @ThisReadingMama (we use the Bob Books in my house) http://ow.ly/P39qC  

Reading with Little Miss Muffet: June 2015 | Tips + recommendations from @mrskatiefitz for reading w/ toddler http://ow.ly/OWQfG 

Sad. BLS study finds "From 2010 to 2014, parents ... read to their kids for 2.4 minutes per day" http://ow.ly/OQXjS  @FiveThirtyEight 

"How does anyone ever find the right book if the right book has to have (certain defined attributes" http://ow.ly/P0B8p  @beasleywrites

The 2015 #BeBookSmart Parent Survey Results from @RIFWEB + @Macys Are In | highlights here: http://ow.ly/P6lKU 

On Reading, Writing, Blogging, and Publishing

So You Want to Be a Writer for Children? Jeff Barger compiles advice from people like @neilhimself http://ow.ly/P3a8y  

Hard to remember what you're reading when eBooks keep cover under wraps, by Julie Sykes @AwfullyBigBlog http://ow.ly/OQYzx 

This piece @WSJ made me want to drop all else to reread Pride + Prejudice: #SummerReading: Time to Visit Old Friends http://ow.ly/P6LJ7 

Parenting

People labeled “smart” at a young age don’t deal well w/ being wrong. Life grows stagnant @jameshamblin @TheAtlantic http://ow.ly/P6nnD

Schools and Libraries

From @PernilleRipp | 3 Education Books that Made Me Who I Am: @donalynbooks @alfiekohn + @Angela_Watson http://ow.ly/P6pXg 

Boys & Learning: 'Active Learning' works! @TrevorHCairney summarizes some recent research http://ow.ly/P0ADQ 

James Patterson @JP_Books + @Scholastic Name First Winners of School Library Grants, reports @Llauren @sljournal http://ow.ly/P0ym6  

This I love: Biloxi Middle School Teachers Transform Unused Lockers into Book Spines | @mental_floss http://ow.ly/P6aZi 

Perfect Partners: Libraries and the Nationwide Pre–K Movement | Linda Jacobson @sljournal http://ow.ly/P6MpQ 

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook


A Library Book for Bear: Bonny Becker & Kady MacDonald Denton

Book: A Library Book for Bear (Bear and Mouse)
Author: Bonny Becker
Illustrator: Kady MacDonald Denton
Pages: 32
Age Range: 3-7

I love Bonny Becker and Kady MacDonald Denton's Bear and Mouse books (starting with A Visitor for Bear). And I love libraries. So when I learned that A Library Book for Bear had been published, I simply had to buy it. For my daughter, ostensibly, but really for myself. In this installment, the ever-energetic Mouse is determined to take his set-in-his-ways friend Bear on this first-ever visit to the library. Bear resists, certain that he has enough books, but eventually does learn that the library has the right book for everyone. 

Reading the start of this book was like visiting an old friend:

"Bear had never been to the library.
He had seven very nice books at home:
three about kings and queens, three about honeybees,
and one about pickles.
Bear was quite sure he had
all the books he would ever need."

That's Bear for you. And I love the whimsy in the fact that he likes books about pickles, of all things. Here's a snippet:

"In the library were ore books than Bear had ever thought there could be.
He quickly found a tucked-away corner. But even here, there were lots and lots of books.
"Hmmph! Terrible extravagant!" Bear's voice was a little loud.

"I shall find you the perfect one," Mouse said quietly in his library voice.

"One about pickles," commanded Bear. After all, he only had one of those."

As in the other books of the series, Bear's voice gets louder and louder as he gets upset (in this case, about not finding the right book, and then about wanting other people to be quiet, so that he can hear storytime properly). I love the vocabulary that Becker drops iinto the book, too: "whisked away", "extravagant", and "cluster", to name a few. Both the word choice and the varying tones and degrees of voice make A Library Book for Bear fun to read aloud. 

I would know Denton's watercolor and ink illustrations anywhere. The slightly muted tones of her color palette are soothing, and she perfectly conveys both Bear's grouchiness and Mouse's optimism. The librarian (a minor character) bears a strong resemblance to the girl from Liz Garton Scanlon's The Good-Pie Party. There's also a lovely fall scene in which we see swirling foliage as a stiff, angry Bear and a joyous Mouse are on the way to the library.

A Library Book for Bear is a welcome addition to our picture book collection: beautiful to look at, enjoyable to read aloud, and celebrating the power of libraries to help even the pickiest reader. 

Publisher: Candlewick Press (@Candlewick)
Publication Date: July 22, 2014
Source of Book: Bought it

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook. This site is an Amazon and iBooks affiliate, and purchases made through affiliate links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).


Growing Bookworms Newsletter: July 1

JRBPlogo-smallToday, I will be sending out a new issue of the Growing Bookworms email newsletter. (If you would like to subscribe, you can find a sign-up form here.) The Growing Bookworms newsletter contains content from my blog focused on children's and young adult books and raising readers. I usually send the newsletter out every two weeks.

Newsletter Update: Can you believe it's July already? I can't. Anyway, in this issue I have four book reviews (picture book to YA). I also have two posts with literacy and reading links that I shared on Twitter recently, and one post about a new literacy milestone for my daughter (writing her own book).

Reading Update: For the past couple of weeks I've been in a serious reading slump (as is Sherry from Semicolon - maybe it's a summer thing). I keep starting and abandoning books, which means that I've completed very few. In the past two weeks I finished one early chapter book, one young adult title, and two adult titles (both audiobooks). These are basically the only books that didn't put me to sleep. I read/listened to:

  • Shannon Hale and Dean Hale (ill. LeUyen Pham): The Princess in Black and the Perfect Princess Party. Candlewick Press. Illustrated Early Chapter Book. Completed June 18, 2015 (read aloud to my daughter). Review to come, closer to publication. 
  • Stephanie Oakes: The Sacred Lies of Minnow Fly. Dial Books. Young Adult Fiction. Completed June 21, 2015, on Kindle. I found this one compelling, but had a hard time getting past one major coincidence, and decided not to review. 
  • Tana French: The Likeness. Penguin Books. Adult Mystery. Completed June 22, 2015, on MP3. This book did completely hold my attention, and it convinced me to go back and listen again to the first book in the Dublin Murder Squad series (which I read probably 7-8 years ago). 
  • Charlaine Harris: Day Shift (Midnight, Texas: Book 2). Ace. Adult Mystery. Completed June 27, 2015, on MP3. I like this new series by Harris. It's reminiscent of the Sookie Stackhouse books, but with a lot less R-rated content. 

I'm listening to The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place by Julie Berry, and reading The Stellow Project by Shari Becker. I have a stack of partially read middle grade novels on my nightstand right now, but I suspect that the problem is me, so I'll likely give them another try before giving up on them. I am looking forward to the audiobook of the newest Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place book, which is next in my queue. 

The books my husband and I have been reading to our daughter can be found here. She adores the second Princess in Black book (The Princess in Black and the Perfect Princess Part), and has already listened to that one twice. We've been reading to her a little bit less, however, because at bedtime she wants to read Bob books to us first (and then we're all tired). She is working her way through the various Bob book collections, and it is very fun to watch her improve. Her repertoire of sight words is increasing every day, as is her ability to recognize a new word from page to page (not having to sound it out every time).

She is also crazy about the books in the Arthur Chapter Books series. I picked up six from the library the other day. I realize that technically these are books that she's meant to read to herself when she's a little bit older. But she wants us to read them to her now. And my view is that, pretty much, what she wants goes. My first priority is for her to enjoy the reading time - if this is what she enjoys, good for her. [We do have a rule that we don't read the Bob Books to her - she gets that this wouldn't make any sense.] 

Speaking of "what she wants goes", we did read the first half of the first chapter of the first Harry Potter book. I had told her that she wasn't old enough, but she begged and begged. She saw the first few minutes of the movie a year ago, while we were waiting for a ride at Universal, and it made a strong impression. So I compromised by agreeing to the first chapter. After we stopped halfway through, though, she never asked to go back, which I took as a sign that I was right - she wasn't ready. There's a whole bit from Vernon Dursley's viewpoint, and I don't think she's ready for the idea that the author could intend the reader to feel differently about something than the character does. 

What are you and your family reading these days? Thanks for reading the newsletter, and for growing bookworms. 

© 2015 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook